Peanut Chicken Thighs (adapted from Eating In, 1986)

One of the more approachable recipes from Eating In is Peanut Chicken Thighs – a simple recipe built mostly from pantry staples that can be on the table in around 45 minutes.  The original recipe calls for the full chicken leg – drumstick with thigh attached – but this is a hard cut to find……

Frijoles Negros con Sofrito (Cuba, adapted from Buen Provecho, New Jersey, 1995)

Years and years ago my local congregation held a Mexican-themed potluck.  I’m not talking about one of those discomfiting frat parties where everyone comes dressed like Speedy Gonzalez; this was more like large scale taco night.  Potluck dishes were supposed to be Mexican or at least Mexican-adjacent, and we had a members of the congregation……

Lamb Shank Vindaloo (inspired by Hotpoint Storybook Kitchen Cookbook, 1964)

Vindaloo is one of my favorite Indian dishes, in part because it’s one of the heartier dishes served at Indian restaurants but mostly because the sour and spicy sauce is addictive and delicious.   It’s now an Indian restaurant staple, but has its origins in a vinegary Portuguese stew.  As such you’ll often find it prepared……

Braised Greens with Paneer

Braised Greens with Paneer is a recipe born of necessity.  If I’m up early on a weekend morning I’ll take a trip out to the specialty butcher for inspiration for Sunday dinner, and then get the rest of the meal at the farm stand up the road.   On this particular weekend I had picked up……

Nargis Kofta, from the New York World’s Fair (adapted from Hotpoint Storybook Kitchen Cookbook, 1964)

Many of the international dishes represented in the Hotpoint Storybook Kitchen Cookbook will be familiar to modern American readers.  Some were already popular, like gazpacho and sauerbraten, which are common submissions in mid-1960s church recipe collections.  Dishes like tabbouleh and couscous are now standard fare at Mediterranean restaurants, and satay and nasi goreng are staples……

Instant Pot Oaxacan Chicken Tacos (adapted loosely from The Tortilla Book)

The most exciting part of The Tortilla Book for me was an introduction to Oaxacan cuisine, which contains all the familiar elements of Mexican cooking but with the addition of candied fruits and sweet, aromatic sauces.  Ms. Kennedy only credits regional influence, with Oaxaca being a melting pot of neighboring cuisines, but the flavor profile……